Rationale for interval training

The premise of interval training is that an individual can produce a greater amount of work in a training session if the training bouts are spaced between periods of lower intensity work. Usually these active recovery (AR) periods are between 30 seconds and one minute in duration (see Chapter 4). Key Points on Active Recovery Exercises lower intensity cardiovascular activity, e.g. walking musculoskeletal endurance (MSE) work, e.g. exercises to improve local endurance of muscles NOT used in the...

The physiological rationale for using heart rate

In healthy individuals and cardiac patients, the common aim of using heart rate is to act as a marker of the physiological strain of the exercising skeletal muscles. Specific to the cardiac patient, the role of heart rate (in conjunction with systolic blood pressure) also acts as a key indicator of myocardial strain (Froelicher and Myers, 2000). As a marker of the body's general physiological strain during aerobic exercise, heart rate is usually described as a percentage of maximal heart rate (...

Choreography And Free Aerobics

Aerobic overload can be delivered using free aerobics. This method sees the exercise leader perform the exercise with the class following the demonstration and cueing of the exercises. The leader should provide alternatives, giving easy and harder options for each exercise. This style of aerobics within the overload section may not be appropriate early in phase III CR until patients have mastered self-monitoring. In free aerobics (exercise to music), where the leader is introducing different...

Resistance Training

Muscle strength, endurance and aerobic function are required for a fully active lifestyle (Pollock, et al., 2000). Muscle strength is defined as the ability of a muscle or muscle group to produce maximal force at a given velocity of movement. Muscle endurance is the ability of a muscle or muscle group to perform repeated muscle actions against a sub-maximal resistance (ACSM, 2001). Resistance exercise (RE) incorporates all types of strength and weight training and will lead to improvements in...

References

American College of Sports Medicine (2000) Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription, 6th edn. Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore, MD. Armstrong, G., Dunn, M., Bredin, Y., McCuskey,F., Brown, C. (2004) Patients' Views on Community Cardiac Rehabilitation. Proceedings of the British Association for Cardiac Rehabilitation Conference. Beswick, A.D., Rees, K., Griebsch, I., Taylor, F.C., Burke, M., West, R.R., et al. (2004) Provision, uptake and cost of cardiac rehabilitation...

Relapse prevention model

Relapse is a breakdown or setback in a person's attempt to change or modify target behaviour. The relapse prevention model was developed to treat addictive behaviours, such as alcoholism and smoking (Marlatt and Gordon, 1985). The model proposes that relapse may result from an individual's inability to cope with situations that pose a risk of return to the previous behaviour. For example, a former smoker finds himself or herself in a social situation with lots of smokers and is tempted to...

Variability in estimated METs

Ainsworth, et al. (1993) have compiled an extensive compendium on the estimated MET values for a variety of physical activities. It is important to recognise that these values are estimates, which means that each individual patient could be working above or below this estimate. The variability of the estimate depends on the simplicity or complexity of the movements. For example, the variability of pedalling an exercise cycle ergometer will likely be less than that of stepping or walking. The...

Hypertension

The frequency remains at 3-5 sessions per week, integrating activity into everyday life. The intensity should be reduced to 50 to 75 HRmax. SBP increases in proportion to the intensity of the activity. Moderate intensity activity should be prescribed to avoid large increases in SBP. When HR and SBP are elevated, the myocardium is working harder and requires more oxygen due to a large increase in RPP. Hypertensive patients have a higher resting BP and when coupled with the associated increase in...

Cardiac Rehabilitation Phase Iii Overload Frequency

Early studies into phase III cardiac rehabilitation CR programmes were based on exercise education sessions that ran three days per week for eight weeks or longer Jolliffe, et al., 2004 . Various studies have been carried out to determine the optimum frequency for cardiac rehabilitation programmes. There is still on-going debate around this topic, but recent literature has shown that two-three times per week, for a minimum of eight weeks, is sufficient to achieve physiological and psychosocial...